28 Year Old London Charity Worker Murdered for His iPhone 7

Abdul Samad, 28, from the Little Village neighborhood of London was stabbed just before midnight on Monday, October 16th, after two “thugs” on mopeds attempted to steal his iPhone 7. Just over an hour later, he was pronounced dead at St. Mary’s Hospital in Paddington.

According to Dailymail, two individuals riding mopeds approached Mr. Samad at 11:45PM, just outside of his flat and attempted to steal his iPhone 7. The confrontation became physical when Samad was stabbed in the heart, according to witnesses.

Samad then made his way to his parents home, less than a dozen yards away, and managed to press the buzzer, desperately seeking help. According to his brother, Abdul Ahad, his parents then rushed to the door to find him covered in blood, and called the authorities.

According to police, two men were arrested on suspicion of murder in the early hours of Tuesday morning. The 17-year-old and 18-year old currently remain in custody at a north London police station. According to a source for The Guardian, “The level of violence used is alarming and concerning. The violence was unprovoked,” as most moped thieves simply rely on speed and surprise to steal phones from unsuspecting victims.

Samad, a worker at Dragon Hall Trust – a charity which works to help young individuals develop computer skills – loved to help children. Nicole Furre, the director at Dragon Hall says “he was great with children and young people and really explained things well… He managed to even make coding exciting.” Samad’s brother echoed that sentiment, saying “He was geeky and loved his computers and that’s why he was helping the young people.”

“This is a young life gone and such a lovely life,” Ahad continued. “He was full of energy and loved the kids he worked with. You’re not going to find a nicer person. It was over a phone, it’s just so senseless.”

The investigation, led by Scotland Yard’s homicide command, is ongoing, and extra police patrols are planned for the area.

from Ian Fuchs – iDrop News https://www.idropnews.com/news/28-year-old-london-charity-worker-murdered-iphone-7/52872/

Review: QacQoc USB-C Hub – More Ports For Your MacBook

The 12″ Retina MacBook is my favorite Apple computer in a long time, and the one I do most of my personal (and much of my professional) work on. It’s incredibly thin and light, has an amazing screen, and offers up enough power for most tasks. My only gripe is the single USB-C Port, because it is used for either connecting external devices, or powering the computer, but out of the box, never both simultaneously.

Most of the time, this isn’t a serious inconvenience, as I don’t frequently need external drives, keyboard, or mouse connected to my MacBook. That is, unless a particular tasks requires me to do extended work with external storage, audio, or video gear, or connect an external display, and be plug in to power at the same time (like recording a podcast). Thankfully, the QacQoc USB-C Hub may be a great solution in those situations.

Overview:

The QacQoc USB-C Hub ($72.99 on Amazon) is an unpowered hub that expands the single USB-C Port of the MacBook (or other USB-C computer) into a 6 different options, giving you the connection you need. Included around the hub are a trio of USB (type A) ports, rated at USB 3 speed, an HDMI port which is capable of driving a 4K screen (at 30hz), an SD card slot, a micro SD card slot, a gigabit ethernet port, and a single USB-C port, which is limited to pass-through power.

The QacQoc hub is small and light weight so adding it to your laptop bag won’t add weigh you down when you’re on the go. The hub comes in MacBook-matched colors, and is finished in a brushed aluminum to really blend in with your Apple gear. The gold model I was sent is a perfect match for my gold MacBook (gold is best!), with the exception of the white surround on the ethernet port, which looks un-Apple-like.

Functionality:

Often times, USB hubs can be flaky, causing a variety of data integrity or even corruption issues. In my testing of the QacQoc, I found that it reliably kept external storage (both thumb drives and external drives) mounted to my MacBook, even when moving from one desk or table to another. The SD Card reader also worked great, and provided much faster transfer speeds than cheap SD Card readers available elsewhere online.

While I don’t have a 4K monitor available to test with, I did find that connecting to an external display through the QacQoc worked as expected, and video appeared clear, and ran at the expected resolution. Due to my current setup, I did not test the ethernet port, so take that into consideration if you’re planning to pick one up.

 

As far as power goes, the ability to simultaneously charge your MacBook and use peripherals as needed is really where the QacQoc shines. Normally, the single port on the MacBook would require disconnecting power to connect something else (and probably a dongle or adapter in the middle). With the QacQoc, that is no longer an issue. Unfortunately, power delivery through the QacQoc isn’t the full 29W that is offered up by the MacBook’s charger. This means significantly longer recharge times when charging through QacQoc.

In an informal test, the QacQoc was projected to take more than twice as long (about 140% longer) to recharge my MacBook than using the MacBook’s 29W USB-C charging block. While that may not be a huge issue when you’re doing light web browsing, email, or document editing, it could make a huge difference with power-intensive tasks like video or audio production, photo editing, or app development in Xcode, which can potentially drain the battery faster than it can charge.

Verdict:

Rating: 4/5

Ultimately, the QacQoc USB-C Hub is worth it if you’re a MacBook owner and you find that you’re swapping dongles and power with any kind of frequency, or need more connectivity than the single USB-C port can offer. Having USB (Type A) ports, SD card and micro SD card slot, ethernet, video, and power ports available, without needing a bulkier computer or a giant bag of dongles and adapters is a great compromise, even though the recharge rate is slower MacBook power adapter.

Pros:

  • Multiple port options for greater connectivity
  • Color-matched to Apple’s laptops
  • SD and micro SD card slots
  • Small and light-weight

Cons:

  • White ethernet port looks un-Apple-like
  • Slower recharge time

If you’re in the market for a USB-C hub for your Mac, and want a great blend of affordable and and functional, the QacQoc is a pretty solid option. It’s available right now for $72.99 on the QacQoc website and on Amazon.

from Ian Fuchs – MacTrast

The End of the “Plus”

Every year, as summer comes to an end, the hype for the next iPhone becomes palpable. Rumors and speculation swirl, and leaks begin to reveal what Apple might be doing at their early fall event.

This year is like every other in some regards, but is also very different in many ways. A summer of leaks and speculation has most people predicting an iPhone with slimmer bezels, a repositioned home button1, and a $1000+ price tag2. What is harder to predict is the other device that will make an appearance in 2017.

In the history of the iPhone, every other year, we get an “S” model phone, which subtly iterates on the previous years device. The iPhone 4S was essentially the iPhone 4, with an improved camera and the addition of Siri. The 5S was the iPhone 5 with added TouchID. The 6S was the 6 with a first generation Taptic motor and the introduction of 3D Touch.

In 2016, with the iPhone 7, for the first time in Apple’s history, the new phone was almost akin to an SS device. Instead of being a new design AND new features, it further iterated on the 6 and 6S design, with only a few notable new features and a familiar size and shape.

Most rumors to date suggest that in addition to the fancy new iPhone (I’m calling it iPhone Pro), there will be an iPhone 7S and 7S Plus. Others suggest that they will skip the 7S moniker and jump to iPhone 8 and 8 Plus. Either way, the general assumption is that there will be a total of 3 iPhone models this year.

I think that’s wrong.

In 2014, 2015, and 2016, it was easy (or easier) to decide which new device you wanted to purchase. If you wanted a smaller, more hand and pocket friendly device, you picked the 6, 6S, or 7. If you wanted the cooler camera features (OIS, Depth Effect, 2X zoom), or wanted a giant screen and more battery, you picked the Plus model.

In 2017, if the iPhone Pro is roughly the same physical size as the iPhone 7, but packs all the camera features and a bigger screen than the Plus, why would anyone buy the 2017 Plus. As it is, differentiating 2 devices is a challenge, aside from screen size, trying to extend that to 3 seems impossibly complex for consumers AND Apple’s marketing team.

This year, I firmly believe Apple will FINALLY fix the naming of their iPhone lineup (much like the rest of their product lines), and will stick with just 2 devices. iPhone and iPhone Pro. No more generation numbers, no more S years, just an iPhone with good specs, and an iPhone with great specs. Selling a good phone to people doesn’t seem to be a challenge for Apple, and selling a great phone seems to come naturally as well. Selling a phone that is good, but not significantly better, but also isn’t great seems much less practical.

Between getting a Plus or Pro, who would pick the Plus? I know I wouldn’t. And I think Apple knows that, too.

Review: OWC USB-C Dock for MacBook

The 12″ MacBook is a remarkable computer. It’s incredibly thin, amazingly light, and an all-around solid machine for most tasks. Unfortunately, to make the device so incredibly sleek, Apple stripped it of any connectivity, with the exception of a headphone jack and a single USB-C port. This has caused many would-be MacBook owners to shy away from the device.

The need for a plethora of dongles to use the MacBook with other USB devices, SD card readers, ethernet or a monitor makes it all the more daunting. Fortunately, thanks to the fine folks at OWC, there is now a dock that expands your MacBook’s single port into a collection of ports and connections to make it a more versatile machine.

Overview

The OWC USB-C Dock for MacBook (starting at $127.99 on MacSales.com) is a multi-port dock, allowing you to extend the connectivity of your 12″ MacBook, 2016 or newer MacBook Pro, and other PCs with USB-C connectivity. The USB-C dock offers you multiple USB ports (4 type A, 1 type C), an SD card reader, audio in/out, gigabit ethernet, display out, and the ability to charge your USB-C computer.

For my testing, OWC sent me the HDMI variant of the dock, allowing me to connect an external monitor (up to 4K resolution) via a single HDMI port. OWC also offers a Mini Display Port model, depending on what your setup requires. Regardless of which video port you need, the dock comes in 4 colors, designed to match the look of your MacBook or MacBook Pro. Personally, a gold dock seemed like it might be a little flashy, so I definitely prefer the Space Gray model, but knowing that option is there is a great selling point for some.

From a functionality standpoint, the USB-C Dock is extremely versatile. After getting my MacBook in 2016, I picked up a 4 separate dongles to allow me to connect various things to the computer, or charge the computer while also using a USB device. Having the OWC Dock has made all of those dongles redundant when I’m at my desk. Having a single USB-C cable going into the MacBook is incredible convenient when the other end is host to a plethora of ports.

When out and about, the OWC Dock is much less convenient. Unlike most dongles, which require no external power, the USB-C Dock needs it’s own power, complete with a a giant a hefty converter box. Not only that, but the dock and power block are both quite thick, especially in comparison to the incredibly thin MacBook.

The biggest perk of the USB-C dock, in my opinion, is the pass-through power, which is rated to 80 Watts. That means that if you’re using a 12″ MacBook, or the 13″ MacBook Pro (with or without TouchBar), you’ll get full power delivery in addition to all the expansion. If you use a 15″ MacBook Pro with TouchBar, you’ll get near full charging power (based on rated 85W). Many other USB-C adapters with similar connectivity deliver much lower power, leading to extremely long recharge times. With the OWC Dock, I saw recharge times equal to that of the Apple-provided charging block and cable.

The only complaint I have with the dock is the length of the included USB-C cable. At roughly 18″, it is very limiting on where I can position the dock, forcing me to leave it residing on my desk, instead of tucked away, out of sight. Currently, there are some standards issues with USB-C cable and device designs that can restrict cable length somewhat, but something in the range of 3′-6′ would have been much more accommodating of keeping a tidy desk space.

Verdict

[Rating: 4.5/5]

The OWC USB-C Dock is a great option for MacBook owners looking to get more out of the single port on their device. Whether you’re looking for HDMI or Mini Display Port, the USB-C dock comes in multiple colors, and offers the same flexibility for extending your workspace. The lack of portability, and the incredibly short USB-C cable are minor sticking points, but not critical flaws by any means.

Pros

  • Extends a single USB-C port into 10
  • 2 Display options, each in 4 Apple-matched colors
  • Sturdy and reliable
  • SD card slot and headphone jack on front for easy access

Cons

  • Included USB-C Cable is very short
  • Dock power adapter is very bulky

If you are the owner of a 12″ Retina MacBook, or a new MacBook Pro, the OWC USB-C Dock is a great option for extending the port(s) of your device to make it more versatile. Head over to MacSales.com to grab the configuration you need, or check out their new Thunderbolt 3 version for 2016 and 2017 MacBook Pro.

from Ian Fuchs – MacTrast

Review: Rowkin Bit Charge Stereo

Apple’s AirPods have quite possibly been the most hyped headphones I can recall. They’re fully wireless, they recharge in their case, they allow you to talk to Siri, and they offer surprisingly decent audio quality. But some say they look stupid, and if your ear isn’t perfectly shaped, they have a tendency to want to sneak out of your head. Then there’s the issue of backorder. Nearly 6 months after their release, they’re still perpetually shipping in 4-6 weeks.

The Rowkin Bit Charge Stereo, on the other hand, claim to offer many of the same features and functions of the AirPods, comes in $30 cheaper, and they’re available with 2-day shipping on Amazon Prime. But can they compete?

Overview

The Rowkin Bit Charge Stereo ($129.99 on Amazon) earbuds are tiny. Unlike the AirPods which have a little stem for the battery and mic, these are as discrete as an earplug.

Rowkin took a more traditional approach When it came to using their EarBuds. Unlike the AirPods, which have no physical buttons, each Bit earbud has a physical multifunctional button on the back, which is used to pair them both to each other, and to your device. After a failed attempt to pair, left me with only 1 of these connected to my phone, I consulted the directions – something I’ve never needed to do with a pair of headphones. Pairing requires pressing both earbuds button, waiting for them to connect to each other – indicated by little white lights – and then connecting via the Bluetooth menu on your device.

Maybe I’ve been spoiled by the magic of the AirPods, but this was a mediocre experience at best. I’m guessing the average person would find this pretty frustrating.

If I had to compare the sound quality of these to something, I would equate it to the speaker of an iPhone 3G, piped straight into your ears. These are $130 earbuds – mind you, they are wireless – but I have $9 wired earbuds that offer notably higher quality sound. The Rowkin Bit earbuds offered almost no perceivable bass, and seemed to distort quickly on the high end of the EQ. Both music and spoken audio were disappointing.

Fit wise, the Bits are a little better than AirPods. Because of their design, they actually fit into your ear hole, so they stay in place much more solidly. While running and working out, I didn’t need to adjust them a single time to make sure they were staying in place. The same is NOT true for AirPods.

Another disappointment is how the headphones interact with one another and your device. Rowkin reference the idea of primary and secondary earbuds in their pairing guide. When everything is connected, the primary earbud blinks a single white light. The secondary blinks twice. This may seem unimportant on the face of it, but becomes important when using your devices digital assistant or making phone calls.

Only the primary earbud can communicate with Siri or handle phone calls. Unlike the AirPods which can act interchangeably, the Rowkins force you to be attentive to which earbud is which. A single tap on either earbud will pause or resume playing audio, but the symmetry ends there. Double tapping the button on the primary earbud will activate your devices assistant. Double tapping the button on the secondary earbud does nothing.

Once you’ve activated Siri – or Google, whatever – the audio responses only come through that same primary earbud… the other one is just there for decoration. An overpriced earplug, if you will.

Of course, when you resume audio, both earbuds return to pumping disappointing sounds into your ears. That is, until you use them while moving. Take, for example, my walk from my car to my desk at work. In the 500 foot walk, the secondary earbud dropped connection or stopped playing audio a whopping 6 times. Each time, after a few moments, it slowly faded back in as if to pretend it was there the whole time.

Whatever technology they are using on these is not worth $130. In fact, the only part of the entire box that felt useful was the charging case for the earbuds, and that’s because the 2100 mAh battery can double as an portable battery for your smartphone. Just plug in to the USB port, and give your device a little boost.

Verdict

All-in-all, the Rowkin Bit Charge earbuds look very compelling online. They’re small, wireless, and actually fit INTO your ear. Unfortunately, their Bluetooth signal is weak, their audio quality is weak, the charging case is probably a little too bulky for your pockets, and functionally, almost any other pair of Bluetooth headphones or earbuds that I’ve used are a better option.

Pros:

  • Secure fit
  • Case doubles as external battery

Cons:

  • Poor sound quality
  • Poor Bluetooth signal
  • Bulky case
  • Confusing Siri/Phone call experience

For $159, the AirPods are incredible. If those don’t work for you, try the $149 Beats X (Certified Refurbished for under $130) because the Rowkin Bits are bad.

 

Disclaimer: The Rowkin Bit Charge Stereo earbuds were provided to me at no cost, for review. All opinions expressed are my own.

from Ian Fuchs – MacTrast